0370 270 6000

already registered?

Please sign in with your existing account details.

need to register?

Register to access exclusive content, sign up to receive our updates and personalise your experience on brownejacobson.com.

Privacy statement - Terms and conditions

the ongoing battle to keep up with technology

4 March 2019
In an era where technological advances are changing the face of how we communicate, the protection of children and young adults remains a challenge for all. Those who care for children, be their parents, guardians, social workers, teachers must move with these developments to ensure that they are keeping track of the new ways in which children might be exploited.

But this is something that cannot be done alone. With the advent of multi-agency working, it is clear that the responsibility for protecting the vulnerable must be a joint effort. In the latest move towards this, the NSPCC has called upon social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat to do more to protect the children that use those platforms.

The NSPCC states that of 1,317 cases in a six-month period, social media was used in 70% of cases. With services like Snapchat, where no log of a conversation is retained on a child’s phone, having those checks and balances being carried out by the social media companies themselves will be paramount to tackling this issue.

With the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority undertaking a review of its scheme and considering whether sexually exploitative behaviour, such as grooming, should be included as a crime of violence and compensated accordingly, those on the front line of protection must move with the times to tackle this issue head on.

related opinions

Marriott International: a look behind the ICO’s £99m fine and what this means for corporate acquisitions

Last month, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) announced notice of its intention to fine (NOI) Marriott International, Inc. £99m for infringements of the GDPR.

View blog

Supreme Court backs employers seeking to enforce restrictive covenants: Tillman v Egon Zehnder Ltd

The Supreme Court in Tillman v Egon Zehnder Ltd has determined that where post-termination restrictive covenants (i.e. “non-compete” clauses) in employment contracts go further than reasonably necessary to protect an employer’s business interests, it can apply the ‘blue pencil test,’ severing the offending words and leaving the remaining enforceable clause in place.

View blog

Watch this space on breach of contract, vicarious liability and assumption of responsibility

The concept of Assumption of Responsibility is on many stakeholders’ minds at the moment following the Supreme Court decision in CN & GN v Poole.

View blog

Sussex Partnership NHS Trust fined £200,000 – A warning for providers and investors

Sussex Partnership NHS Trust was sentenced on 14 June 2019 for failing to provide safe care and treatment to a 19 year old inmate being cared for on the hospital wing of Lewes Prison, Jamie Osborne.

View blog

mailing list sign up



Select which mailings you would like to receive from us.

Sign up