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Social care, for both children and adults, is a large and dynamic sector involving public, private and charitable organisations. Changes in statutory frameworks and associated new duties, complex procurement and commissioning practices for local authorities and an active, funded and competitive private sector, all mean that providers face a breadth of legal challenges. Our multi-disciplinary team understands your environment and the law. Our goal is to ensure we meet the differing objectives of all providers.

What we do

  • Our clients - over 50 local authorities, registered charities, residential and domiciliary care providers, insurers, sports governing bodies, religious organisations and inspectorates including the Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales.
  • Over 20 years' experience - we act for inspectorates, conduct child and vulnerable adult protection audits and policy reviews and attend risk management committees.
  • 20 dedicated lawyers - based in Nottingham, Exeter, London and Birmingham, the largest specialist team in private practice.
  • Ongoing training - on the latest regulatory developments and government guidance.

Featured experience

A local authority

Guiding a local authority on their transition to being part of an ICS, including reviews of structures and governance.

A local authority

Supporting a local authority in a complex supplier dispute and successful transition to a new provider. Dispute included commercial disputes, overpayment issues, and threatened JR of service user care plans and of MO decisions.

At the forefront of legal a developments

At the forefront of legal a developments in social care liability, including acting for the Defendant in Armes on the scope of vicarious liability for foster carers, and currently in cases on duty of care of local authorities and the role of the Human Rights Act in liability claims arising from safeguarding interventions.

Foster care claim

Successfully defending a foster care claim on the basis it was statute barred, although the judge in this case concluded that a non-delegable duty could be owed.

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