0370 270 6000

13 years for first FGM conviction

11 March 2019
The first conviction of female genital mutilation (FGM) has resulted in a 13 year jail sentence for the child’s mother. This comes more than 15 years after the enactment of the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 and 33 years after the Prohibition of Female Circumcision Act 1985, which first made the practice illegal.

Despite allegations of FGM rising almost fivefold in recent years, prosecutions for this form of child abuse have been unsuccessful up till now - largely as a result of difficulties in obtaining sufficient proof.

The DfE have issued various statutory and non-statutory guidance for multi-agencies, resource packs on FGM and made express reference to the duty on teachers to report suspected FGM in Keeping Children Safe. In addition, draft statutory guidance on the new sex and relationships education regulations includes references to teaching secondary age pupils about the illegality of FGM and availability of support.

As a result of schools and other agencies sharing information with the police, hundreds of FGM protection orders have been issued. It may have taken decades, but hopefully this first conviction and the raft of other preventative measures will combat this horrific practice and protect children at risk.

Related opinions

Judicial Review of school exclusion reconsideration dismissed on all grounds

The recent case of R (on the application of A Parent) v Governing Body of XYZ School [2022] EWHC 1146 (Admin) provides some welcome and reassuring guidance to governing boards on the exclusion reconsideration process.

View blog

60 seconds with… Emma Hughes

With 19 HR experts now supporting over 500 schools and trusts across the country, in this edition of 60 seconds we sit down with Emma Hughes, who leads the team, to discuss what this significant milestone means to her.

View blog

Fines for unsafe removal of asbestos in schools

In order to reduce the risk of potential breaches, schools should follow this Health and Safety Executive guidance.

View blog

Asbestos: Still the UK’s number one occupational killer

A ResPublica report highlighted that asbestos continues to be the UK’s number one occupational killer, with nurses and teachers 3 to 5 times more likely to develop mesothelioma than the general UK population. The House of Commons Work & Pensions Select Committee is investigating how the HSE manages the continued presence of asbestos in buildings.

View blog

Mailing list sign up

Select which mailings you would like to receive from us.

Sign up