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Annual Injury and ill-health statistics for Great Britain: still too high?

6 November 2019

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has released its annual report detailing the number of injuries and incidents of ill-health in workplaces across Great Britain, and its statistics show that this number is too high.

The annual report comprises statistics taken from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and other sources, showing the number of work-related ill health, workplace injuries, working days lost, enforcement action and the associated costs.

Key Figures

The key figures for Great Britain in the period 2018/2019 are as follows:

  • 1.4 million working people suffering from a work-related illness
  • 2,526 mesothelioma deaths in 2017 due to past asbestos exposures
  • 147 workers killed at work
  • 0.6 million injuries occurred at work according to the LFS
  • 69,208 injuries to employees reported under RIDDOR
  • 28.2 million working days lost due to work-related illness and workplace injury
  • £15 billion estimated cost of injuries and ill health from current working conditions

In terms of high-risk sectors, the statistics show that there has been no significant change, with construction and agriculture remaining at the forefront.

The HSE’s annual report serves as an important reminder of the legal requirement to maintain high standards of health and safety in workplaces across the UK.

Our team of health & safety lawyers advise a number of private and public bodies in relation to their ongoing obligations to promote good health, safety and welfare practice in the workplace. Contact Rachel Lyne if you would like an initial discussion.

The full annual injury and ill-heath statistics report can be found here.

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