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Transformative health-tech in 2018

18 January 2018

Last week, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas showcased some emerging consumer technologies, including every-day wearable health-tech, from a sensor which tests food for peanuts to air-bags for your hip. As more Baby Boomers enter their golden years, the opportunities for applications of such relatively simple health-tech gadgets are plenty.

At the other end of the complexity spectrum, research and development into brain-computer interfaces, which allow the manipulation of computers and machinery with thoughts, is excitingly progressing. Understandably, the uptake and commercialisation of this sort of technology will be more cautious. Setting aside ethical and moral concerns (of which there are many), hurdles abound, including privacy and cyber-security issues which inevitably arise wherever there is interconnectivity. The law will play an important role in balancing the regulation of these technologies with allowing them to have the positive impact their potential promises..

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