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more pressure on employers to help crackdown on illegal working

21 May 2015

The Government has today fleshed out some of the detail behind its manifesto to significantly reduce net migration. According to the Guardian, this includes proposals to introduce:

  • a new criminal offence permitting the seizure of wages of illegal migrants
  • tags on illegal migrants so it’s easier to locate them
  • compulsory advertising of all jobs to the resident market
  • a new labour enforcement agency focussing on labour market exploitation.

Whether or not this will reduce net migration to the “tens of thousands” remains to be seen. What is clear is that this will inevitably result in further pressure on employers to ensure that they play their part (e.g. by undertaking the appropriate document checks before an employee starts work).

If you’re not already familiar with the requirements, now is the time to get up to speed – if any of your migrant workers are found to be working illegally, it could also result in fines of up to £20,000 per illegal migrant and criminal convictions for you.

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