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European Parliament votes through new EU Directive on cyber-security

21 March 2014

The European Parliament has voted in support of the revised draft of the Network and Information Security Directive (NISD). The aim of the Directive is to ensure a common level of cybersecurity across the EU and is intended to bring in compulsory security obligations on ‘public authorities’ and ‘market operators’.

The Directive has been amended by various committees of MEPs since it was introduced. The latest changes include a revised list and definition of ‘market operators’ to include companies which are deemed important to national infrastructure like energy companies, banking and financial service companies and companies operating within the telecommunications, health and transport sectors.

The Commission is seeking final agreement and adoption of the Directive by the end of 2014.

This is clearly a step forward but a number of issues are to be resolved such as how exactly the Member States will co-operate with each other and how the NISD will interact with other legislation, particularly the European Data Protection Regulation.

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