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Grand Theft Auto V – enough to make you sick?

18 September 2013

This week’s launch of the ‘GTA V’ has caused some unexpected problems for employers, with reports that many people were considering calling in sick so they could go and buy the game.

Employers who are concerned about employees ‘pulling sickies’ should consider the following steps:

• training for line managers – in asking sympathetic and appropriate questions when employees call in sick. They should find out and record why the employee is unable to work and when they expect to return. If the absence is prolonged or recurring, it may be appropriate to ask about medical treatment

• return to work interviews – it may be worth sitting down with the employee when they get back to work. The meeting can be brief and informal but evidence shows that employees who are considering calling in sick may think twice if they know that they will be required to explain their reasons when they return.

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