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employment tribunal fees now in force

29 July 2013

Today marks the introduction of employment tribunal fees in the UK, with employees facing costs of up to £1,200 to bring a claim against their employer. The key stages of proceedings will attract a fee, from submitting the claim form to appealing the decision. The fee-level will vary depending on the type of claim, with unfair dismissal and discrimination cases (type A) being more expensive than disputes over unpaid wages or redundancy pay (type B).

It is hoped that the new system will act as a deterrent for frivolous and vexatious claims, however union opposition on the issue is widespread, with GMB currently staging a protest outside of the London Central Tribunal and Unite General Secretary, Len McCluskey, describing the fees as ‘a throwback to Victorian times’. Unite has already confirmed that it will pay members’ fees on their behalf, and if the majority of unions adopt their approach, it may be that the fees end up having little practical effect.

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