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draft employment tribunal fees order released

30 April 2013

The draft Employment Tribunals and Employment Appeal Tribunal Fees Order 2013 has been released, with the aim of introducing fees for employment tribunal claims. July 2013 seems likely for its implementation.

The tribunal system cost the taxpayer £84m in 2011-12. It is hoped that fees will reduce that cost.

‘Simpler’ claims, e.g. for wages, will cost £160 to issue and £230 for the hearing. More complex claims, e.g. for unfair dismissal, will cost £250 to issue and £950 for the hearing.

Exemptions from the fees are available to those who are in receipt of certain benefits (including jobseeker’s allowance), or have low overall incomes or have low disposable incomes. As most claimants to an employment tribunal will not be in employment and therefore most probably in receipt of a qualifying benefit or have a low income, we will have to wait and see how much these fees actually reduce the cost to the taxpayer.

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