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Court rejects APIL’s RTA portal fee case

4 March 2013

APIL’s attempt to judicially review the government’s decision to reduce RTA portal fees was rejected by the High Court on 1 March.

The judges gave short shrift to the arguments advanced by APIL and other claimant bodies saying the case had been brought too late in the day but that in any event it had little merit.

The claimants had argued there had been insufficient consultation with the claimant groups who had effectively been ignored on the subject. However the court suggested the government could choose who to speak or not speak to. It was further suggested that if it was felt that one particular viewpoint was being ignored then that should be addressed via the ballot box and not through the courts!

Whilst it looks as if an appeal is likely, the chance of that appeal succeeding appears remote. With the reforms due to come into effect in under a month it seems clear that reduced fees for RTA claims are here to stay.

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