0370 270 6000

already registered?

Please sign in with your existing account details.

need to register?

Register to access exclusive content, sign up to receive our updates and personalise your experience on brownejacobson.com.

Privacy statement - Terms and conditions

child abuse cases – are general damages really going up?

5 November 2012

A claimant has recovered £193,543 against her convicted grandfather for serious sexual abuse in the as yet unreported case of GLB v TH ( 31.10.12)

The claimant alleged that sexual abuse took place between the ages of 10 and 16. Although there was a continuing effect the claimant was able to work, and with treatment the prognosis was good. In that context, the award seems high and might alarm defendants and their insurers.

She was awarded £67,500 for Pain Suffering and Loss of Amenity . Even given the extreme breach of trust, the length of time the abuse took place and the nature of the abuse, this is a lot. The JSB guidelines suggest general damages for cases of this nature range from £13,650 to £39,150

The judgment needs taking seriously by industries that might face similar claims, and their insurers, but also with a pinch of salt . After all, the Defendant Grandfather took no part in the litigation and was unrepresented at the assessment of damages hearing.

related opinions

Digitisation of Civil Claims and the Online Court - Is Covid-19 set to accelerate the reforms?

In 2016, Lord Justice Briggs set out his proposals for restructuring the civil courts and tribunals in England and Wales. The vision for modernising court services and creating the “Online Court” has seen the introduction of online platforms for civil claims in recent years but progress has been described as slow.

View blog

An exit for public sector exit pay

It took over 5 years for secondary legislation implementing the £95,000 cap on public sector exit payments to be brought into force; only a few months later, the Government has announced that the Public Sector Exit Payments Regulations 2020 (the “Regulations”) will be revoked, citing “unintended consequences” which have been identified after “extensive review”.

View blog

Part 36 – is a loophole about to be closed?

Part 36 offers in litigation are used tactically to make a settlement offer while simultaneously placing the other side on risk of not ‘beating’ that offer at trial.

View blog

The Debt Respite Scheme and its implications for creditors

The Debt Respite Scheme (Breathing Space Moratorium and Mental Health Crisis Moratorium) (England and Wales) Regulations 2020 is due to come into force on 4 May 2021. It’s a snappy title but what exactly is it?

View blog

mailing list sign up



Select which mailings you would like to receive from us.

Sign up