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4 July 2012

A 26yr old ex-soldier recently received £300,000 damages having sustained severe hearing loss and tinnitus due to prolonged exposure to noise from drum and bugle practice between 2004 and 2008.

As a result of his disability he was discharged in 2011 from service which commenced at age 18 and in which he planned to continue to serve until aged 40.

The reported hearing loss at 15db would normally not be considered too significant, but for the claimants young age, although it is for the effects of the tinnitus that the majority of General Damages were awarded.

Tinnitus is a subjective but potentially disabling condition which causes great difficulties in sufferers and which here appears to have resulted in his discharge aged just 26 and in particular, awards for £140,000 for future loss of earnings and £75,000 in respect of loss of pension.

It is a salutary lesson in the potential effects of tinnitus, particularly on awards of damages and financial loss in hearing loss claims.

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