0370 270 6000

The internet, but not as we know it

13 January 2012

Yesterday ICAAN opened its doors to applications for generic top level domains (gTLDs). Applicants will be able to apply for specific words or letters as an alternative to the recognised top level suffixes of .com, .net and .org. Examples of early applications are .london and .pepsi (i.e. http://mybrand or customerservice@mybrand).

The changes have led to widespread concern, with companies fearing reputational damage if their key brands and trade marks fall into the wrong hands. However, with a non-refundable “evaluation fee” of $185,000 and careful policing promised by the registries, there should be a significant barrier in the way of most Internet fraudsters.

The industry is estimating we will see around 1,500 initial applications for gTLDs. In our opinion, gTLDs represent a new frontier on the Internet and, in turn, a great opportunity for companies to stake their claim with key trade marks or creative new branding.

Related opinions

Right to Work Checks: Changes from 6 April 2022

From 6 April 2022, right to work checks on all migrant or settled prospective employees must be online and checks on British or Irish nationals will be manual (free) or digital (charged for).

View blog

Are whistleblowers entitled to keep their employer’s confidential documents?

In Nissan v Passi, the High Court recently considered the issue of an employee retaining confidential documents belonging to his former employer in the context of the employer’s application for an injunction seeking the return of such documents from the employee.

View blog

Important opportunity to comment on case law precedent

The UK government is considering extending this power to depart from retained EU case law to additional lower courts and tribunals, namely the Court of Appeal in England and Wales and the High Court of Justice in England and Wales and their equivalents.

View blog

Sky’s overly broad trade marks narrowed as found partially invalid for bad faith

Lord Justice Arnold has applied the guidance of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) to the evidence before him, in the long standing trade mark dispute between Sky and Skykick.

View blog

Mailing list sign up

Select which mailings you would like to receive from us.

Sign up