0370 270 6000

already registered?

Please sign in with your existing account details.

need to register?

Register to access exclusive content, sign up to receive our updates and personalise your experience on brownejacobson.com.

Privacy statement - Terms and conditions

Forgotten your password?

2012 - what to expect in employment law

6 January 2012

The dawn of 2012 brings the annual discussion about upcoming employment law developments. The following may be of particular interest to employers:

  • The qualifying period for unfair dismissal is expected to be increased from one to two years in April
  • Pensions auto-enrolment for larger employers begins in October
  • Consultations are to be progressed on the introduction of the following:
    • ‘protected conversations’ between employers and employees about employment issues
    • a standard text for compromise agreements
    • allowing smaller employers to execute ‘no fault’ dismissals on payment of a prescribed sum
    • early compulsory conciliation of all claims
    • introduction of fees to bring a tribunal claim

The government is keen to reduce the amount of red tape in employment law to support business and boost the economy. This will be welcomed by employers. However care must be taken to ensure that the changes improve the effectiveness of the current framework, and do not simply add to employers’ administrative burden.

Related opinions

Evidence of guilt not always required for fair dismissal

This case offers particularly helpful guidance for employers when being faced with employees who are suspected of criminal wrongdoing, albeit care should always be given to ensure allegations are clearly defined and considered on their own merits.

View blog

Does the move into Step 4 mean the ending of Covid-19 restrictions within schools?

With the Prime Ministers announcement that he intends for Step 4 to begin on 19 July, this will also bring an end to the restrictions currently in place on education settings.

View blog

Handing back an empty shell of a building did not prevent a tenant from exercising a break clause

Break rights have proved a fertile source of litigation over the last few years. More often than not, tenants have found themselves on the wrong end of the decisions. However, a Court of Appeal decision yesterday has bucked that trend.

View blog

Responsibilities towards students identifying as non-binary

Our top tips for supporting transgender and non-binary pupils.

View blog

Mailing list sign up

Select which mailings you would like to receive from us.

Sign up