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default retirement age draft regulations clarified

21 March 2011

The government has now clarified in the new default retirement age draft regulations that the existing rules allowing employers to retire employees by issuing retirement notices on or before 5 April 2011 apply to all employees who have reached age 65 at any time before 1 October 2011. This is a change to the original draft, which stated it was only applicable to those whose 65th birthday falls between 6 April and 1 October 2011.

As a reminder, those employees who will be aged 65 or over by 30 September 2011 must be informed by their employer of their intention to retire them on or before 5 April 2011. If an employee asks to work beyond the retirement date proposed by their employer, an employer may safely grant an extension of up to six months without losing the right to retire them at the end of this period.

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