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Privacy statement - Terms and conditions

playing by the rules

27 October 2010

The Olympics, Paralympics and London Olympics Association Act 2006 introduced draconian powers that will have serious implications for UK companies that wish to take advantage of the London Games.

The act created the ‘London Olympic Association Right’ which gave the London Organising Committee (LOCOG) substantial powers to prevent unauthorised association between a business’ goods or services and the London 2012 Olympic Games.

The Government has now introduced further Regulations The Olympics, Paralympics and London Olympics Association Rights (Infringement Proceedings) Regulations 2010 (SI 2010/2477) which come into force on 8 November 2010 and give the High Court the power to order the erasure, removal, obliteration or destruction of any offending representations. LOCOG may apply to the court for the delivery up of infringing goods or articles, which may then be destroyed.

The Regulations illustrate what a huge battleground the London 2012 Olympics will become and companies will need to understand the parameters clearly before embarking upon related advertising campaigns.

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