0370 270 6000

already registered?

Please sign in with your existing account details.

need to register?

Register to access exclusive content, sign up to receive our updates and personalise your experience on brownejacobson.com.

Privacy statement - Terms and conditions

TUPE – A more measured approach needed

10 September 2010

The TUPE regulations require outgoing employers to inform and consult with employee representatives if they envisage taking measures in respect of employees. Outgoing employers rarely take such measures, or so we thought.

In Todd v Strain the transfer happened on 4 January 2008. The outgoing employer paid wages for 1 to 3 January shortly after the transfer, rather than at the end of the month, estimating the PAYE deductions. The Employment Appeal Tribunal decided that this was a “measure” that required consultation. This decision means that seemingly harmless administrative steps needed in TUPE transfers that have no adverse consequences for employees are ‘measures’ requiring consultation – an obligation to be taken seriously, since an Employment Tribunal can award up to 13 weeks’ pay per employee for a failure to comply.

Such a literal interpretation of the regulations is surely not what was intended?

related opinions

Anti-social media - but when is it work related?

As the use of social media continues to increase, its overlap with working life is becoming more and more prevalent.

View blog

IR35 changes - six months and counting...

In his 2018 Autumn Budget, the then Chancellor, Phillip Hammond, announced a significant change to the way liability for IR35 breaches will be dealt with for private sector companies from April 2020.

View blog

Court of Appeal confirms all employment tribunal judgments must be published on the register, except in national security cases

Under the ET Rules, all judgments and accompanying written reasons must be published on a pubic register which the general public can access online.

View blog

Supreme Court backs employers seeking to enforce restrictive covenants: Tillman v Egon Zehnder Ltd

The Supreme Court in Tillman v Egon Zehnder Ltd has determined that where post-termination restrictive covenants (i.e. “non-compete” clauses) in employment contracts go further than reasonably necessary to protect an employer’s business interests, it can apply the ‘blue pencil test,’ severing the offending words and leaving the remaining enforceable clause in place.

View blog

mailing list sign up



Select which mailings you would like to receive from us.

Sign up