0370 270 6000

already registered?

Please sign in with your existing account details.

need to register?

Register to access exclusive content, sign up to receive our updates and personalise your experience on brownejacobson.com.

Privacy statement - Terms and conditions

online auction fixer faces £50k fine

14 May 2010

Paul Barrett, the first person convicted in the UK of making sham bids on eBay, could be fined £50,000 after pleading guilty to 10 charges under consumer protection laws.

Barrett, a 39 year old minibus driver from County Durham, had engaged in “shill bidding” – the online practice of using a different username to bid on your own auctions.

In pleading guilty Mr Barrett said that he had not realised that bidding on his own items was a criminal offence.

Mr Barrett is due to be sentenced at Bradford County Court on 21 May where he faces fines up to a maximum of £5,000 for each of the 10 offences.

This will no doubt act as a strong deterrent to other unscrupulous traders and should provide some consolation to those who have paid over the odds.

related opinions

COVID-19 child protection practice - four months in - lessons learned so far

In June 2020 the University of Birmingham published a research briefing exploring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child protection practice.

View blog

“Caution” is now the watchword when it comes to directly awarding public sectors contracts

The judicial review proceedings brought by the Good Law Project against the Department of Health and Social Care in relation to the £108m contract the Department awarded for PPE in April are about to shine a light on Regulation 32(2)(c) of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015.

View blog

Will there be a return of employment tribunal fees?

The Government is reportedly considering the reinstatement of tribunal fees in respect of employment claims.

View blog

Redundancy: competitive interview processes

In this case, the Respondent’s appeal was unsuccessful. In the first instance, the decision that it unfairly dismissed various claimants following the closure of the school where they worked. The Claimants were unsuccessful in applying for substantially similar positions at a new school that opened at the same site. Read more here.

View blog

mailing list sign up



Select which mailings you would like to receive from us.

Sign up