0370 270 6000

already registered?

Please sign in with your existing account details.

need to register?

Register to access exclusive content, sign up to receive our updates and personalise your experience on brownejacobson.com.

Privacy statement - Terms and conditions

fines for Data Protection Breaches Are Coming

19 April 2010

The Information Commissioner has new powers to fine organisations up to £500,000 for breaches of the Data Protection Act that take place after 6 April. 

Fines can only be imposed if a breach is serious and likely to cause substantial damage or distress. Also, only deliberate breaches or breaches where reasonable steps to prevent a foreseeable breach were not taken are covered. 

The example of a ‘serious’ breach given in the Information Commissioner’s guidance is the loss of medical records during a move.

The Information Commissioner has said that he will “not hesitate to use these tough new sanctions for the most serious cases where organisations disregard the law”, and the next company or government department who hit the headlines for losing information should expect to be hit with a punitive fine as well as bad publicity.

related opinions

Government announces ten-year programme of school rebuilding

Ambitious funding plans, announced recently by the Prime Minister, have made clear that spending on school buildings is seen as a key element of efforts to stimulate the economy post-COVID.

View blog

Important opportunity to comment on case law precedent

The UK government is considering extending this power to depart from retained EU case law to additional lower courts and tribunals, namely the Court of Appeal in England and Wales and the High Court of Justice in England and Wales and their equivalents.

View blog

A landlord’s promise, a tenant’s power

When it comes to leases, most people believe that landlords hold most of the power. However, in relation to long residential leases, the tables may well have recently turned in one respect at least following a recent Supreme Court decision.

View blog

Sky’s overly broad trade marks narrowed as found partially invalid for bad faith

Lord Justice Arnold has applied the guidance of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) to the evidence before him, in the long standing trade mark dispute between Sky and Skykick.

View blog

mailing list sign up



Select which mailings you would like to receive from us.

Sign up