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Cookie compliance - common wording may soon make life easier

30 March 2012

From 26th May 2012 companies wishing to continue using cookies on their websites will need to ensure users give “opt in” consent to the use of those cookies. Currently companies can rely on implied or “opt out” consent. This consent also requires website users to be given a clear description of the cookies that are used and what they do.

How you ensure you get consent and therefore can still track website traffic without putting the user off is understandably vexing many online businesses.

The message is don’t despair. The International Chamber of Commerce is expected to soon publish its Code of Common Language which sets out ways of describing cookies which, if it gains universal acceptance, should make it easier to distinguish between types of cookies and how to describe them in a way that users can accept.

The guidance will be a useful tool to help put your policy together, saving valuable time with examples of easy and widely accepted language.

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Richard Nicholas

Richard Nicholas

Partner and Responsible for In House Lawyers

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