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Working together – falling apart?

31 March 2014

A report by the NSPCC has highlighted the current deficiencies in the safeguarding system which means that around 1 in 9 children are receiving appropriate support and that social service departments are only reacting to emergency situations rather than undertaking early preventative work to avoid the escalation of problems. Whilst funding is an ongoing issue, the post Saville landscape has resulted in a huge rise in demand for social service intervention. The report highlights the greater need for other agencies and schools to take on responsibilities to identify and act on issues earlier and work alongside social services to reduce the risk of harm.

The idea of working together is nothing new – co-operation between agencies involved with children has formed the core of child protection work for many years. There is an expectation placed on schools to ensure they have systems in place to support children and clear lines of communication within which they can raise concerns. Only when all agencies do work together on a proactive rather than reactive basis will there be progress on the safeguarding agenda.

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