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Open all hours – the next education reform?

23 December 2013

In a submission to the teachers’ pay review board, the DfE has set out the case for removing some restrictions in teachers’ pay and conditions – including the total hours and days worked over a year. These proposals alongside other changes which allow schools to set the length of school days and terms could lead to schools being open for longer each day and year. Reports suggest moves towards 5 or 7 term years with a maximum of 4 weeks holiday at any one time may become more common or more extreme examples such as Norwich Free School which is open 51 weeks a year.

It is likely that there would be opposition towards such moves from teaching and other unions. Other issues would also arise – where would the funding come from to meet increased salaries and other costs and what impact would there be on families? The move, whilst controversial, would be positive in that more continuous learning may assist in raising standards and narrowing the gap between the haves and have-nots.

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