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Are injunctions the answer to bullying?

30 July 2013

It is being proposed that headteachers are to be given the power to apply for a crime prevention injunction to stop anti-social behaviour, such as bullying in schools. This potential power arises from agreed amendments to the current police and crime bill going through Parliament. The injunction would place the pupil under specified restrictions and supervision with the potential consequences of breaches including an electronic tag, supervision order, curfew or imprisonment. With 70% of ASBOs being breached, it is likely to have a negative impact on the pupils concerned without bringing any real changes in behaviour.

These injunctions will be made by the court rather than the headteacher, with the possibility that an injunction may not be granted by the court. This may persuade already sceptical headteachers that measures currently available to them would be more effective than the proposed “big stick” approach.

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