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teachers say no to performance related pay

27 March 2013

Teachers at the annual conference of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) have voted unanimously to urge ministers to scrap their plans for performance related pay, and re-instate the former national pay structure.

This vote comes hot on the heels of the announcement last week that the two largest teaching unions would strike later this year, with the implementation of performance related pay being central to their decision. The ATL, considered to be the most moderate of the teachers organisations, has held back from such a move, arguing that their membership had not expressed a desire to follow suit. Whilst reports from their conference suggest that the membership is increasingly unhappy with the changes, the organisation continues to hold back from advocating strike action.

This development confirms our present view that the wider profession does not want to strike, but is the tide turning?

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